Friday, February 08, 2008

Lake Louise Snowscapes


Watching the Stars While They Were Watching Me (2008) acrylic on archival panel, 8x10

Having taken a time out upon my return from the Rocky Mountains to investigate what is going on with my health, I am now back at it. After being poked, prodded and, as Monty says, "garden hosed", lymphoma was ruled out for a second time. Hopefully we'll know more at the end of February. They suspect an auto-immune disorder like Lupus. I can deal with that! I just want to make art.

Many new works are now up here.

I have noticed two different directions in recent work, with regards to what I am seeing and how I am putting the paint on the support, be it paper or canvas:

1. The mark/path making, combined with a move to more abstract method and textures - -
versus 2. the softer, idiomatic 'scapes - albeit some with daring cadmium red peeking out. ("Winter Conversation") I am hanging onto both approaches, but the pull towards the former is very strong.

I welcome your comments and questions! Someone asked me today: "Do you think you see color and contrast differently when you are ill? I am asking because you said you had a fever while you were at L.L."

YES! This is absolutely true. As my agent Roxanne will attest, I then push that and see where it goes. Creating when you are tired or mourning or angry can be interesting, too. Some of my more successful work for bands was done while suffering from insomnia. (KiTTie, Daniel Powter, etc.) Of course, painting while happy, stress free and rested is a process to consider as well. Hee hee... (Barbados!) That is when I have time to loll and return to the spot, and take my time. Some of these works go into the trash however, because I tend to overwork them. (Thank you, M.)



2 comments:

Pater Ludi said...

My dear child, these are brilliant. Pursue the new directions. -- Pater Ludi

Ilse said...

I like these new paintings. The colours are so vivid! I also recognise that Star painting! I saw it for myself in the home of the happy collector. Will we call this new period of your art style the feverish period?